Note from the Author
Reader Comments (8)


Snitchee

Hard to keep up with your output boss. I'm easily running more than a million words behind but I did read this post so give me my gold star.

(FYI, the Arisen teleplay link is 404.)

A thought re: stress and burn out...
"Most people in high-stress, decision-making industries are always operating at this kind of simmering six, as opposed to the undulation between deep relaxation and being at a 10." -Josh Waitzkin (chess wunderkind and someone in search of deep learning/mastery; this is a bad quick description of him, read his book: "The Art of Learning: An Inner Journey to Optimal Performance")

So in order to get to 10/10 with focus and drive, you have to be able to also achieve a 0/10 via relaxation & recovery. In order to switch ON intensely, you need to switch OFF intensely. If you never switch off, you can never turn it all the way on (without paying the price) and end up burnt out.

Simplistic but difficult. Both sides require commitment and steady practice. Go at your fastest only because you are also able to go at your slowest. I think you've found out how fast you can go, now how slow can you go?






Michael

Going at 0mph is the only future I can see. (I.e. what I do seems to me impossible, every time, and now is no different. I feel pretty done.)




Michael

Okay, maybe you're right. Thank you.




Michael

In Beyond Training: Mastering Endurance, Health & Life, Ben Greenfield says the biggest training mistake most people make is not going hard enough on their hard days... but, much more critically, not going nearly easy/slow enough on their slow/recovery days.

Maybe that's the mistake I've been making.




Snitchee

Interesting...I love when the same insight comes from experts in totally disparate areas. It suggests there is something fundamental.




Snitchee

Interesting...I love when the same insight comes from experts in totally disparate areas. It suggests there is something fundamental.




Snitchee

As pertains to your top tier operator world...seems like the best are able to turn it on AND off. And as we learn more about PTSD, it is the inability to turn OFF the learned hypervigilance that seems to be a key aspect of the disorder.

Vast majority of military training is in how to fight, how to make decisions to stay alive, etc. all geared to turning it to maximum ON. I'm sure there is comparably little emphasis on how to turn your shit OFF.

As part of PTSD therapy, the VA teaches various relaxation techniques but that is after the fact and it takes sustained work for these techniques to be effective treatment.

It's assumed people instinctively know how to "relax"; I think that assumption needs rethinking.





Michael

That actually seems to be one of the lessons from what I happen to be reading right this second:





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